Windy City Media Group Frontpage News
Celebrating 30 Years of Gay Lesbian Bisexual and Trans News
home search facebook twitter join
Gay News Sponsor Windy City Times 2018-10-17
DOWNLOAD ISSUE
About WCMG Publications News Index  Entertainment Features Bars & Clubs Calendar Videos Advertisers OUT! Guide    Marriage

Sponsor
Sponsor
Sponsor

  WINDY CITY TIMES

TELEVISION Series continues to examine transgender people's lives
Special to the online edition of Windy City Times
by Andrew Davis, Windy City Times
2018-05-22

facebook twitter pin it google +1 reddit email


In 2004, Dr. Bruce Hensel hosted and co-directed The Opposite Sex: Rene's Story and The Opposite Sex: Jamie's Story—two series that looked at two trransgender individuals' quests to undergo their long-awaited gender-confirmation surgeries.

Fast-forward to 2018, and Hensel is back with Showtime's Beyond the Opposite Sex, which look at Rene Pena's and Jamie Alter's continuing journeys.

Windy City Times: How did you initially become involved in this documentary series?

Dr. Bruce Hensel: Well, I've got many lives, [including] chief medical correspondent for many years, so I've ran across many stories. I'm always thinking about what's important to the public and what's not understood.

In the middle of 2003, my partner Stu Krasnow—a well-known reality-TV producer—were talking about possibilities. It struck us that no one had followed someone who wanted to get what is now called gender-affirmation surgery. I wanted to show that part of the journey.

I wrote to every surgeon around the world who I knew who had done these surgeries, and I told them that I wanted to follow people who had just begun hormone treatments, and we wanted to go deeply into their lives and make a difference in other lives. I got about a hundred candidates. We chose Jamie and Rene because of how open and brave they were, and we did those movies.

Then, I stayed in touch with them over the years. And then, I thought no one had really showed what happened after. Of course, you have Caitlyn Jenner and the Wachowski sisters; a lot of people report on the transition, but how does it turn out? So I pitched Showtime again and I said, "Look: There are four [aspects of] this: Jamie and Rene, middle America and the change between then and now."

WCT: I found it very interesting that they're both from the South. Did that factor into your initial decision to choose them, in that things might be tougher there?

BH: I wish I could answer "yes," but the answer's actually "no." What played the major role was, "Who are these people?" A lot of people do issue-related movies, but in this case it was about Jamie and Rene—who they are. The location never played a role.

WCT: Will there be another movie 14 years down the line?

BH: People have asked me that and, I'll tell you, if you had asked me in 2003 if I would do a follow-up on Jamie and Rene, I would've said, "No way." But staying in touch with them changed my mind, so maybe it'll happen again. Rene is a person who sees himself as an alpha male who wants to be with women; Jamie sees herself as a woman who doesn't care who she's with, sexually. [Alter is currently with another woman.] Arin, a transgender male in his 20s, talks with Rene in the movie and says, "Sex is about you want to have sex with; gender is about who you want to have sex as."

So, the short answer is, "No, I don't anticipate another movie about them—but I didn't anticipate one in 2003." But you never know. Surgery is not the end but the beginning for many people.

WCT: The movie also includes perspectives from others, such as family members and exes.

BH: Yes. One of the things I said to the chiefs at Showtime was about those four [aspects]. Many of the people who had violent and fearful reactions to Jamie's and Rene's decisions have changed, and much of America has changed its opinion in terms of knowledge. Many people didn't know about [transgender people], and now they do, although they still have a way to go.

There's a big scene at the beginning of the movie with a group of transgender parents, adolescents and teens—and I thought that part was crucial. Also, I wanted to put Jamie's and Rene's journeys together.

WCT: I thought it was interesting that Jamie said she simply wanted to be referred to as a woman instead of a trans woman.

BH: Right. And within the LGBTQ community, this is a debate. When she was asked if she wanted to be an advocate and an activist, Jamie said, "No; I came out at a different time. I care about me." The debate is that many transgender people feel that they have to fight, while many others feel that once they've gone through gender-affirmation surgery, they just want to be seen as women and men.

WCT: Have Rene and Jamie met—and, if they have, have they kept in touch?

BH: No, they haven't. Part of the reason is circumstance, and another part is that I'm not sure how they'd get along. Rene is a very intense man who believes in spouting his philosophy; Jamie is calmer and more settled within herself. We do have festivals coming up, and we've invited them so maybe they will meet—but they're very different people.

WCT: What was the most surprising thing for you while making this documentary?

BH: As a producer, nothing is surprising. But it was a little surprising to see who open and accepting a lot of people [in the movie] are—as well as how normal Rene and Jamie are.

WCT: You mean regarding them leading everyday lives?

BH: Well, yes. Many transgender people have economic difficulties, and their lives are relatively normal. Simply wanting to go through gender-affirmation surgery doesn't mean that something is wrong with you; there's nothing aberrant about Rene and Jamie. I mean, we all have issues—but they're like anyone else. That's a better way to put it.

WCT: There are so many lessons in this documentary. Is being what you just said about Rene and Jamie living like anyone else one of those lessons you want people to take away from it?

BH: Absolutely. I would hope that people realize that there's a spectrum within every group of people. People shouldn't judge; the way we are isn't necessarily the way others are. That's one thing.

People ask me why I do what I do: It's about getting to the truth. My desire is to produce documentaries, movies and scripted series that have a social impact and tell stories. Having been a medical correspondent for so many years, I want to explore what else there is to share. Every journey is different.

Beyond the Opposite Sex is on Showtime. Visit www.sho.com/titles/3447755/beyond-the-opposite-sex .


facebook twitter pin it google +1 reddit email





Windy City Media Group does not approve or necessarily agree with the views posted below.
Please do not post letters to the editor here. Please also be civil in your dialogue.
If you need to be mean, just know that the longer you stay on this page, the more you help us.


  ARTICLES YOU MIGHT LIKE

Gay News

TELEVISION 'Glitterbomb' engages queer Latinx community 2018-10-16 - Television now has its first national queer Latinx talk show with a gay Latino cast. LATV's Glitterbomb debuted last month and is ...


Gay News

NATIONAL Dreiband criticized, third gender category in NYC, Spirit Day 2018-10-16 - Sharon McGowan—the Lambda Legal chief strategy officer and legal director, and former senior career Civil Rights Division official—spoke out against the U.S. Senate ...


Gay News

Transmilitsry documentary premieres Thursday Nov. 15 on Logo 2018-10-15 - New York, NY, October XX, 2018 — Logo today announced that the groundbreaking documentary, "TransMilitary," will make its television debut on Thursday, November ...


Gay News

Personalities speak against anti-LGBTQ bullying for Spirit Day Oct. 18 2018-10-10 - New York, NY, Monday, October 11, 2018 — GLAAD, the world's largest lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender ( LGBTQ ) media advocacy organization, today ...


Gay News

New York City Mayor Signs Pivotal Gender Marker Bill 2018-10-10 - [New York, NY] In a significant step forward for transgender, gender nonconforming, and nonbinary New Yorkers, today at the Edie Windsor SAGE Center ...


Gay News

NUNN ON ONE Trans singer Kim Petras talks family, transition, big break 2018-10-10 - Transgender singer Kim Petras is performing for the first time nationwide at large concerts, thanks to Troye Sivan, who is on his "The ...


Gay News

Leslie Jordan is now one of 'The 'Cool Kids' 2018-10-10 - Out actor Leslie Jordan may have finally landed his dream role of Sid on a new television show called The Cool Kids. ...


Gay News

Selling it like Ryan Serhant 2018-10-10 - Everything is coming up roses for Ryan Serhant these days. This year, the Bravo celebrity celebrates a seventh season of Million Dollar ...


Gay News

Angelica Ross returns TransTech project to Chicago 2018-10-10 - Angelica Ross, an actress and entrepreneur now based in Atlanta who was long active in Chicago advocacy circles, has a key piece of ...


Gay News

'Trans 101' forum Oct. 11 in Loop 2018-10-10 - The forum "Trans 101: Laws and Policies Affecting The Transgender Community" will take place Thursday, Oct. 11, 4-5:30 p.m., at Hinshaw & Culbertson ...


 



Copyright © 2018 Windy City Media Group. All rights reserved.
Reprint by permission only. PDFs for back issues are downloadable from
our online archives. Single copies of back issues in print form are
available for $4 per issue, older than one month for $6 if available,
by check to the mailing address listed below.

Return postage must accompany all manuscripts, drawings, and
photographs submitted if they are to be returned, and no
responsibility may be assumed for unsolicited materials.
All rights to letters, art and photos sent to Nightspots
(Chicago GLBT Nightlife News) and Windy City Times (a Chicago
Gay and Lesbian News and Feature Publication) will be treated
as unconditionally assigned for publication purposes and as such,
subject to editing and comment. The opinions expressed by the
columnists, cartoonists, letter writers, and commentators are
their own and do not necessarily reflect the position of Nightspots
(Chicago GLBT Nightlife News) and Windy City Times (a Chicago Gay,
Lesbian, Bisexual and Transegender News and Feature Publication).

The appearance of a name, image or photo of a person or group in
Nightspots (Chicago GLBT Nightlife News) and Windy City Times
(a Chicago Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual and Transgender News and Feature
Publication) does not indicate the sexual orientation of such
individuals or groups. While we encourage readers to support the
advertisers who make this newspaper possible, Nightspots (Chicago
GLBT Nightlife News) and Windy City Times (a Chicago Gay, Lesbian
News and Feature Publication) cannot accept responsibility for
any advertising claims or promotions.

 

 

 

TRENDINGBREAKINGPHOTOS

Sponsor
Sponsor
Sponsor


 



Sponsor

About WCMG Publications News Index  Entertainment Features Bars & Clubs Calendar Videos Advertisers OUT! Guide    Marriage


About WCMG      Contact Us      Online Front  Page      Windy City  Times      Nightspots      OUT! Guide     
Identity      BLACKlines      En La Vida      Archives      Subscriptions      Distribution      Windy City Queercast     
Queercast Archives      Advertising  Rates      Deadlines      Advanced Search     
Press  Releases      Event Photos      Join WCMG  Email List      Email Blast     
Upcoming Events      Todays Events      Ongoing Events      Post an Event      Bar Guide      Community Groups      In Memoriam      Outguide Categories      Outguide Advertisers      Search Outguide      Travel      Dining Out      Blogs      Spotlight  Video     
Classifieds      Real Estate      Place a  Classified     

Windy City Media Group produces Windy City Queercast, & publishes Windy City Times,
The Weekly Voice of the Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual and Trans Community,
Nightspots, Out! Resource Guide, and Identity.
5315 N. Clark St. #192, Chicago, IL 60640-2113 • PH (773) 871-7610 • FAX (773) 871-7609.